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Plant Families for Pollinators

Plant Families for Pollinators

How plants are classified can offer intriguing insights because the characteristics that contribute to family groupings provide information about the pollinators attracted to the plants.

Teaching Kids to Protect Our Pollinators

Teaching Kids to Protect Our Pollinators

This summer at North Wind Day Camp in Canton, New York, 49 curious and intrepid campers, ages 7-12, earned the Pollinator Patch created by Cabot Creamery Cooperative and KidsGardening. The free patch program was developed to help children understand the importance of...

Planting for Pollinators

Planting for Pollinators

Over 75% of all flowering plants are pollinated by insects and other animals. This article features pollinator profiles and planting tips to feed and shelter these vital garden visitors.

Encourage Pollinators and Beneficial Insects

Encourage Pollinators and Beneficial Insects

Welcoming beneficial insects can help you have a more successful garden, and also offers opportunties to introduce students to the idea of the garden as an interconnected ecosystem.

Food Exploration

Food Exploration

Using their senses, kids will explore and develop a deeper appreciation for food.

Nurturing Resilience in Gardens — and Kids

Nurturing Resilience in Gardens — and Kids

Anyone who has planted and tended a garden knows to expect the unexpected. After all, even the most meticulously planned and planted gardens are subject to the whims of nature — downpours, wind, pests and diseases, drought, etc. Now, climate change is exacerbating these challenges. How can we foster resilience in gardens so that they can endure and recover? Can kids build their own resilience to challenges by nurturing this quality in their garden plants? This article explores both questions.

Organize a Garden Cleanup

Organize a Garden Cleanup

Bring together gardeners of all ages from your community to organize a garden or local green space cleanup! Tidying up and beautifying a local park, school garden, community garden, or even a neighbor’s garden is a simple but significant way to practice environmental stewardship and foster a sense of connection.